The Annunciation through the lens of a 17th century Dutch painter. 

The Annunciation, about 1660-1665, Godfried Schalcken. J. Paul Getty Museum.

The flowing red robes of an ambassador to the Pope.
Portrait of Agostino Pallavinici, 1621-1623, Anthony van Dyck. J. Paul Getty Museum.

The flowing red robes of an ambassador to the Pope.

Portrait of Agostino Pallavinici, 1621-1623, Anthony van Dyck. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Some bathed in light, others hidden in shadow, the many expressive faces in this painting tell the Greek legend of King Croesus’ audience with philosopher Solon. Moral of the story? Wealth does not equal happiness. 

This painting reflects the culture of 17th century Holland, one of ambivalence toward wealth and consumption.

Solon before Croesus, about 1650-1652, Nikolaus Knupfer. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Landscapes within landscape.

The Banks of the Marne at Dawn, about 1888, Albert Dubois-Pillet. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Pompeii has been a site of curiosity since excavations began in 1748. 21st century cinema only deepens this fascination. 
The Forum at Pomepii with Vesuvius in the Background (Detail), 1841, Christen Schjellerup Kobke. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Pompeii has been a site of curiosity since excavations began in 1748. 21st century cinema only deepens this fascination. 

The Forum at Pomepii with Vesuvius in the Background (Detail), 1841, Christen Schjellerup Kobke. J. Paul Getty Museum.

classic-art:

The Drawing Lesson
Jan Steen

Evidence that Van Gogh time traveled to leave his self-portrait behind.
The Drawing Lesson (detail), 1665, Jan Steen. J. Paul Getty Museum.

classic-art:

The Drawing Lesson

Jan Steen

Evidence that Van Gogh time traveled to leave his self-portrait behind.

The Drawing Lesson (detail), 1665, Jan Steen. J. Paul Getty Museum.

(via jaded-mandarin)

Picked fresh.
Still Life with Lemons, Oranges and a Pomegranate, about 1620–40, Jacob van Hulsdonck. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Picked fresh.

Still Life with Lemons, Oranges and a Pomegranate, about 1620–40, Jacob van Hulsdonck. The J. Paul Getty Museum


Portrait of a lady with roses in her hair, Detail. (1854) by Joseph Weidner


Roses and myrtle, both symbols of Venus, the goddess of love.
Portrait of Madame Joubert, 1787, Francois-Xavier Fabre. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Portrait of a lady with roses in her hair, Detail. (1854) by Joseph Weidner

Roses and myrtle, both symbols of Venus, the goddess of love.

Portrait of Madame Joubert, 1787, Francois-Xavier Fabre. J. Paul Getty Museum.

(via jaded-mandarin)

The loyal greyhound of goddess Diana.
This painting marks a departure from Ricci’s earlier Baroque compositions to a more Rococo style of pastel color, lighter touch and less serious subject matter. 
Diana and Her Dog (detail), about 1700 - 1705, Sebastiano Ricci. J. Paul Getty Museum.

The loyal greyhound of goddess Diana.

This painting marks a departure from Ricci’s earlier Baroque compositions to a more Rococo style of pastel color, lighter touch and less serious subject matter. 

Diana and Her Dog (detail), about 1700 - 1705, Sebastiano Ricci. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Side by side: Abduction of Europa

Rembrandt’s Europa is flustered and worried, she digs her fingers into the white bull’s back as he makes his escape. Lorrain’s Europa has no idea the trouble about to come as her trusted attendants adorn the seemingly innocent beast with flowers.

Both set in dramatic landscapes, these two depictions of Europa’s abduction are studies of nature, narrative, and suspenseful subject matter. 

The Abduction of Europa, 1632, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Coast View with the Abduction of Europa
, about 1645, Claude Lorrain. J. Paul Getty Museum.

This piece was one of the first deviations from J. Paul Getty’s original collecting areas. He was “struck by the remarkable quality of Sorolla’s paintings, being especially fascinated by his unique treatment of sunlight.”
Corner of the Garden, Alcazar, Sevilla, 1910, Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida. J. Paul Getty Museum.

This piece was one of the first deviations from J. Paul Getty’s original collecting areas. He was “struck by the remarkable quality of Sorolla’s paintings, being especially fascinated by his unique treatment of sunlight.”

Corner of the Garden, Alcazar, Sevilla, 1910, Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Titian and his workshop made at least seven versions of this painting.

This version is the only composition that shows the Magdalene’s Bible resting on a cloth-covered support rather than the usual skull.

The Penitent Magdalene, 1555-1565, Titian. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Saint Catherine of Alexandria lived quite the epic life. As seen on this panel by Donato and Gregorio d’Arrezzo, the scenes from her life range from a quiet baptism, an infamous debate with pagan scholars, the miraculous survival from death by a spiked wheel, and then ultimately her beheading.
Happy Feast Day to St. Catherine!
St. Catherine of Alexandria: Scenes from Her Life, about 1330, Donato and Gregorio d”Arezzo. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Saint Catherine of Alexandria lived quite the epic life. As seen on this panel by Donato and Gregorio d’Arrezzo, the scenes from her life range from a quiet baptism, an infamous debate with pagan scholars, the miraculous survival from death by a spiked wheel, and then ultimately her beheading.

Happy Feast Day to St. Catherine!

St. Catherine of Alexandria: Scenes from Her Life, about 1330, Donato and Gregorio d”Arezzo. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A gorgeous grape harvest! Don’t miss the shaded pomegranate on the bottom left of the painting.

Still Life with Grapes and other Fruit, about 1630s, Luca Forte. J. Paul Getty Museum.

"Is that the Irises on your scarf?”
"Oh yes. I’m a flowers person."
"Do you come for the painting?"
"I stay for the gardens."
Sharron, November 19, 2013

"Is that the Irises on your scarf?”

"Oh yes. I’m a flowers person."

"Do you come for the painting?"

"I stay for the gardens."

Sharron, November 19, 2013

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