Chivalry first developed as a code of honor that emphasized bravery, loyalty, and generosity for knights at war in the 11th and 12th centuries.

#NowOnViewChivalry in the Middle Ages

Pages from A Tournament Book, 1560-70, Unknown. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XV 14

You could cut this tension with a knife!

Joseph struggles to escape the seducing grasp of the wife of the Potiphar, the Pharaoh’s guard. The very cape that shimmers and sparkles in this painting becomes evidence used against Joseph.

Joseph and Potiphar’s Wife, about 1630, Guide Reni. J. Paul Getty Museum. 

"Hey Dude!"

That doesn’t seem like too far off for a cry of a street vendor from the series called “Cries of Paris.

However, this is an idealized depiction of a peasant who has sturdy clogs, a short jacket, and apron. Such vision sold higher numbers of these small sculptures to wealthy patrons.

Figure of a Street Vendor, about 1755 - 1760, Mennecy Porcelain Manufactory. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Eye-to-eye with a mystery man.
He closely resembles painter Francois Boucher, whose eyes rendered paintings like this one. 
In 18th century France, terracotta busts were popular additions to the home as they were relatively inexpensive, and fit for both middle class and wealthy consumers.
See the full picture here.
Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.
Bust of a Man, about 1760, Attributed to Jean-Jacques Caffieri. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Eye-to-eye with a mystery man.

He closely resembles painter Francois Boucher, whose eyes rendered paintings like this one

In 18th century France, terracotta busts were popular additions to the home as they were relatively inexpensive, and fit for both middle class and wealthy consumers.

See the full picture here.

Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

Bust of a Man, about 1760, Attributed to Jean-Jacques Caffieri. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Flat, clear vessels with broad areas of smooth glass were made in the 1500s to accommodate demand for enabled decoration.
This is over a foot tall, and was made to hold beer for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It was also shared on festive occasions, and noted humanist Erasmus gives this advice to his readers in On Good Manners for Boys:

"Chew your food before you drink and do not raise the cup to your lips without first wiping them with a napkin or cloth, especially if someone offers you his cup when drinking from a common cup."

Wise man.
Beaker with the Arms of Puchner (Stangenglas), 1587, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Flat, clear vessels with broad areas of smooth glass were made in the 1500s to accommodate demand for enabled decoration.

This is over a foot tall, and was made to hold beer for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It was also shared on festive occasions, and noted humanist Erasmus gives this advice to his readers in On Good Manners for Boys:

"Chew your food before you drink and do not raise the cup to your lips without first wiping them with a napkin or cloth, especially if someone offers you his cup when drinking from a common cup."

Wise man.

Beaker with the Arms of Puchner (Stangenglas), 1587, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Today is the Feast Day of St. Gabriel, aka the Archangel that brought Mary the news of her pregnancy.

He’s also the patron saint of messengers and communications workers. 

The Annunciation, about 1240, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.
The Annunciation, about 1660-1665, Godfried Schalcken. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Bust of an Angel, 1609, Hendrick Goltzius. J. Paul Getty Museum.
The Annunciation, about 1025 - 1050, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Listen carefully, you can almost hear the string instruments echoing through the galleries and through time.
Music and art go hand in hand; artists have depicted music, musicians, entertainment, theater, and sound for centuries. Page through Music in Art here.
#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

Listen carefully, you can almost hear the string instruments echoing through the galleries and through time.

Music and art go hand in hand; artists have depicted music, musicians, entertainment, theater, and sound for centuries. Page through Music in Art here.

#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

China as imagined by a 17th century French designer of luxury goods.

Musicians, acrobats, monkeys and dancing rats join in on the embarkation celebration as the wife of Chinese emperor Shun Chi sails away. 

This scene is one of ten tapestries in the The Story of the Emperor of China series, only one other surviving example of this scene still exists today.

See the whole series here.

The Empress Sailing from The Story of the Emperor of China Series, woven about 1697 - 1705, Beauvais Tapestry Manufactory; after designs by Guy-Louis Vernansal. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A courtly strut along a winding path. 

The decorated border reveals perhaps a C, an X, and a Y. It’s difficult to make out, but these initials likely hold the key to the manuscript’s unknown patron.

#NowOnView in the new rotation of Chivalry in the Middle Ages

Young Men and Women Outdoors, about 1460 - 1470, French. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Head flasks were a trend starting in the 1st century A.D.

A little taller than 6 inches, this young man’s head could be filled with any liquid. 

Blue Head Flask, A.D. 300 - 500, Roman. J. Paul Getty Museum.

7 swords, 7 sorrows, 7 tragic events related to Christ’s life and death.

Today is the Feast of the Virgin of Sorrows, and in this illumination we see the seven events in Christ’s life that brought Mary her sorrow.

The Seven Sorrows of the Virgin, about 1525 - 1530, Simon Bening. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Trois crayons, or three-colored chalk, was a technique Watteau may have learned by studying drawings by Peter Paul Rubens.

Made to study the movement of this woman’s costume, Watteau kept hundreds of drawings together as a reference for any composition. The central figure appears in Embarkation for Cythera at the Louvre. 

Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

Studies of Three Women, about 1716-1717, Jean-Antoine Watteau. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Eye-to-eye with a member of the Roman cavalry. This mask, a part of a larger helmet, may represent Aphrodite, Artemis or even Apollo. This elaborate mask would have been used ceremonially.
See the full picture here.
Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.
Mask from a Cavalry Helmet, A.D. 75 - 125, Unknown. Roman. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Eye-to-eye with a member of the Roman cavalry. This mask, a part of a larger helmet, may represent Aphrodite, Artemis or even Apollo. This elaborate mask would have been used ceremonially.

See the full picture here.

Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

Mask from a Cavalry Helmet, A.D. 75 - 125, Unknown. Roman. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Justice by moonlight.

Divine Vengeance and Justice move swiftly to catch a fleeing criminal. Made as a study for a monumental painting for a criminal courtroom in the Palace of Justice in Paris, this dramatic scene certainly conveys the inspiration of Roman Poet Horace.

"Retribution rarely fails to pursue the evil man."

Justice and Divine Vengeance Pursuing Crime, about 1805 - 1806, Pierre-Paul Prud”hon. J. Paul Getty Museum.

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