The moon was visible, yet unreachable by keen astronomers like John herschel in the late 19th century. This photograph is actually of a detailed papier-mâché model of a moon crater. 

Moon Crater, late 1850s, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

We went to the moon in 1969.

But humans have been looking at and recording Earth’s moon for centuries and centuries.

The Creation of the Sun, Moon, and Stars,about 1250-1260, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Two Diagrams with the Sun and the Moon, after 1277, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Mantel Clock, about 1790-1800, Movement by Nicolas-Alexandre Folin; enamel plaques by Georges-Arien Merlet. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Moon Landscape, late 1850s, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Big hair, light steps.

This drawing is of a 18th century high society English woman wearing all the in vogue styles of the time.

Observing and sketching high-dressed and fashionable ladies strolling through St. James’ Park in London was an important preparatory step for Thomas Gainsborough. Though the commission for King George III of England was never executed, many drawings remain, including this one from the britishmuseum.

A Lady Walking, about 1785, Thomas Gainsborough. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A Writer’s Tools

A writer’s tools might include an inkwell and papyrus scrolls or less expensive wax tablets and stylus. The tablets could also be bound and they could be erased with the flat end of the stylus. Papyrus was made of the pith of a water plant; ink was a mixture of soot, resin, wine dregs and cuttlefish.

Roman Terracotta Inkwell (1st or 2nd Century A.D.)

Roman/Egyptian Papyrus Letter (early 3rd Century A.D.)

Byzantine/Egyptian Wooden Tablet (500-700 A.D.)

Roman Bronze Stylus (1st or 2nd Century A.D.)

  (x)(x)(x)(x) The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

So beautiful!

(via 336bc)

A peek beneath the skin. Anatomy for your Thursday. 

Tabvla libri IIII. from Vivae imagines partivm corporis hvmani aereis formis expressae, 1566, Frans Huys, Pierre Huys and Andreas Vesalius. Getty Research Institute.
Votive Statuette
, 4th century B.C., Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Surgical anatomy
, 1851, Joseph Maclise. Getty Research Institute.
Male figure with skin removed
from Vivae imagines partivm corporis hvmani aereis formis expressae, 1566, Andreas Vesalius. Getty Research Institute.

Beautiful work by architect Richard Meier! The curves at the entrance of the museum are designed to soften the grids created by the travertine squares.

Beautiful work by architect Richard Meier! The curves at the entrance of the museum are designed to soften the grids created by the travertine squares.

deyoungmuseum:

Happy National Donut Day, everybody! Feast your eyes on Wayne Thiebaud’s Dark Cupcakes and Donuts to celebrate. Nom nom!
Wayne Thiebaud (American, b. 1920). Dark Cupcakes and Donuts, 2006. Gravure on gampi paper chine collé. Crown Point Press Archive, gift of Crown Point Press. 2010.39.19.5

We’ve got fruit, we’ve got game, but we don’t have doughnuts. Thanks for yours, deyoungmuseum!

deyoungmuseum:

Happy National Donut Day, everybody! Feast your eyes on Wayne Thiebaud’s Dark Cupcakes and Donuts to celebrate. Nom nom!

Wayne Thiebaud (American, b. 1920). Dark Cupcakes and Donuts, 2006. Gravure on gampi paper chine collé. Crown Point Press Archive, gift of Crown Point Press. 2010.39.19.5

We’ve got fruit, we’ve got game, but we don’t have doughnuts. Thanks for yours, deyoungmuseum!

eyerockphere:

i didn’t really get a good picture of it, but this was my favorite painting at the getty. i don’t really even know how to describe why i love it.

There is such overwhelming detail and color, it’s hard to photograph! Here’s a high res file (that you can download if you wish) to zoom and scroll around in. Happy viewing!

Baronne de Domecy, about 1900, Odilon Redon. Pastel and graphite on light brown laid paper. J. Paul Getty Museum.

eyerockphere:

i didn’t really get a good picture of it, but this was my favorite painting at the getty. i don’t really even know how to describe why i love it.

There is such overwhelming detail and color, it’s hard to photograph! Here’s a high res file (that you can download if you wish) to zoom and scroll around in. Happy viewing!

Baronne de Domecy, about 1900, Odilon Redon. Pastel and graphite on light brown laid paper. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A shrimp and fish cameo!
Animals on carved gems were often symbolic, but the meaning of these sea creatures is unclear. Perhaps they might simply represent ‘food.’ Keeping it simple.
Cameo Gem, A.D. 1-100, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A shrimp and fish cameo!

Animals on carved gems were often symbolic, but the meaning of these sea creatures is unclear. Perhaps they might simply represent ‘food.’ Keeping it simple.

Cameo Gem, A.D. 1-100, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

This Romano-Egyptian mummy portrait is expressive, detailed and incredibly informative about fashion during the Flavian dynasty. Her hoop earrings look similar in shape to these with heads of maenads (female followers of the Greek god of wine).

Mummy Portrait of a Woman, A.D. 75 - 100, Attributed to the Malibu Painter. Romano-Egyptian, Egypt, Encaustic on wood. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Hoop Earrings with Maenads, 100 - 1 B.C., Unknown. Greek, Eastern Mediterranean, Gold. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Dancer, choreographer, filmmaker, and writer Yvonne Rainer is one of the most influential artistic figures of the last 50 years. 
Yvonne Rainer: Dances and Films is now on view at the Getty Research Institute. 

Dancer, choreographer, filmmaker, and writer Yvonne Rainer is one of the most influential artistic figures of the last 50 years. 

Yvonne Rainer: Dances and Films is now on view at the Getty Research Institute. 

Even paintings sometimes need the day off. Van Gogh’s Irises taking a day trip to the conservation studios for study.

Even paintings sometimes need the day off. Van Gogh’s Irises taking a day trip to the conservation studios for study.

sollertias:

Madame de Pompadour by François Boucher, 1754 (details)

(via jaded-mandarin)

Everybody seems pretty nonchalant for seeing Saint Lawrence enduring torture on a flaming grill. But don’t worry, this bright and detailed illumination depicts God welcoming his soul into heaven with open arms.

The Martyrdom of Saint Lawrence, about 1340, Pacino di Bonaguida. J. Paul Getty Museum.

legionofhonormuseum:

Meet Tama, the Japanese dog! Henri Cernuschi, Tama’s owner, traveled throughout East Asia for three years and brought back more than this little cutie from his travels. Cernuschi’s collection of Asian art was so extensive that he used it to found the Musée Cernuschi in Paris. Tama, however, must have rivaled some of his owner’s most cherished art treasures, because Cernuschi commissioned none other than Edouard Manet to paint the dog’s astute portrait, which is now on view in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art! 
Edouard Manet (French, 1832-1883), Tama, the Japanese Dog, c. 1875, oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon


"Ruff ruff, Tama!"
(This pooch is 100 years older than Manet’s Tama, but still looking sharp!)
Maria Frederike van Reede-Athlone at Seven (detail), 1755-1756, Jean-Etienne Liotard. J. Paul Getty Museum.

legionofhonormuseum:

Meet Tama, the Japanese dog! Henri Cernuschi, Tama’s owner, traveled throughout East Asia for three years and brought back more than this little cutie from his travels. Cernuschi’s collection of Asian art was so extensive that he used it to found the Musée Cernuschi in Paris. Tama, however, must have rivaled some of his owner’s most cherished art treasures, because Cernuschi commissioned none other than Edouard Manet to paint the dog’s astute portrait, which is now on view in Intimate Impressionism from the National Gallery of Art

Edouard Manet (French, 1832-1883), Tama, the Japanese Dog, c. 1875, oil on canvas. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

"Ruff ruff, Tama!"

(This pooch is 100 years older than Manet’s Tama, but still looking sharp!)

Maria Frederike van Reede-Athlone at Seven (detail), 1755-1756, Jean-Etienne Liotard. J. Paul Getty Museum.

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