Artist Harry Smith collected airplanes he found on the streets and sidewalks of New York:
"Folded from the ephemera of the times, these airplanes not only preserve clues describing their culture, but are also enigmatic reminders of the changing whims and passions of the human heart in an ever-changing world. They tell a story of countercultures within a commercial world, a story of the arts, a story of ordinary people going about their extraordinary lives."
—Jan Bender of the Getty Research Institute on what may actually be the World’s Largest Paper Airplane Collection

Artist Harry Smith collected airplanes he found on the streets and sidewalks of New York:

"Folded from the ephemera of the times, these airplanes not only preserve clues describing their culture, but are also enigmatic reminders of the changing whims and passions of the human heart in an ever-changing world. They tell a story of countercultures within a commercial world, a story of the arts, a story of ordinary people going about their extraordinary lives."

—Jan Bender of the Getty Research Institute on what may actually be the World’s Largest Paper Airplane Collection


"People consider Los Angeles to be this chaotic, sprawling mess. This exhibition reveals that there is a plan, there is an order and a system to L.A. But I think its complexity is what makes it so interesting." —Chris Alexander, curator

What is your L.A.? 
On this week’s Getty Voices, curators Chris Alexander and Lyra Kilston are taking to social media and on-site informal “office hours” inside the exhibition at the Getty Center (Tuesday, May 14, 12-1pm; Wednesday, May 15, 12-1pm; and Thursday, May 16, 2-3pm) to hear your stories. L.A. is a complex place that perhaps is best described through a weaving of personal narratives.
This week we’re all ears, so please come talk to us in person, on Facebook or on Twitter #OurLA!
Case Study House #22, Pierre Koenig: view of two women in white dresses, 1960, Julius Shulman. The Getty Research Institute, Julius Shulman Photography Archive.

"People consider Los Angeles to be this chaotic, sprawling mess. This exhibition reveals that there is a plan, there is an order and a system to L.A. But I think its complexity is what makes it so interesting." —Chris Alexander, curator

What is your L.A.? 

On this week’s Getty Voices, curators Chris Alexander and Lyra Kilston are taking to social media and on-site informal “office hours” inside the exhibition at the Getty Center (Tuesday, May 14, 12-1pm; Wednesday, May 15, 12-1pm; and Thursday, May 16, 2-3pm) to hear your stories. L.A. is a complex place that perhaps is best described through a weaving of personal narratives.

This week we’re all ears, so please come talk to us in person, on Facebook or on Twitter #OurLA!

Case Study House #22, Pierre Koenig: view of two women in white dresses, 1960, Julius Shulman. The Getty Research Institute, Julius Shulman Photography Archive.