What Beautiful Muscles You Have
Antonio Cattani created these engravings in the 1780s based on sculptures by Ercole Lelli, who examined at least 50 cadavers in preparation. The sculptures were created for the “anatomical theater” of the medical school at the University of Bologna, a room dedicated to the teaching of anatomy through dissections of human bodies. The engravings helped art students master the parts of the body.
More on these life-size engravings, new in the collection.
Anatomical Figures, 1780 (left) and 1781 (right), Antonio Cattani. The Getty Research Institute

What Beautiful Muscles You Have

Antonio Cattani created these engravings in the 1780s based on sculptures by Ercole Lelli, who examined at least 50 cadavers in preparation. The sculptures were created for the “anatomical theater” of the medical school at the University of Bologna, a room dedicated to the teaching of anatomy through dissections of human bodies. The engravings helped art students master the parts of the body.

More on these life-size engravings, new in the collection.

Anatomical Figures, 1780 (left) and 1781 (right), Antonio Cattani. The Getty Research Institute

Eye to eye with a mystery man in Korean dress.
How did Rubens meet him? Where did they interact? Is he even a real man? Details of red chalk in the face complete this costume study.
This drawing is such a beautiful and interesting study that a past exhibition focused on its origins. More on the Iris.
See the full picture here.
Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

Eye to eye with a mystery man in Korean dress.

How did Rubens meet him? Where did they interact? Is he even a real man? Details of red chalk in the face complete this costume study.

This drawing is such a beautiful and interesting study that a past exhibition focused on its origins. More on the Iris.

See the full picture here.

Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

Did you catch Francois Boucher’s signature woven onto the rocks? Look closely.

Venus Emerging from the Waters, about 1776 - 1778, Woven at the Gobelins Tapestry Manufactory; after cartoon by Francois Boucher. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Wounds making a comeback. 

Kings, clergy, aristocrats, and monks gather in awe at this depiction of the Second Coming of Christ. Here his wounds are depicted as objects of reverence, rather than objects of sorrow.

The Worship of the Five Wounds, about 1525-1530, Simon Bening. J. Paul Getty Museum.

"I’m an interior designer, he’s an antique dealer. This place is very inspiring. The repetition, the geometry, and the colored marble windows are all ideas I love. I’m always looking for new ideas."
—Kew (on the right) and J. David, September 29

"I’m an interior designer, he’s an antique dealer. This place is very inspiring. The repetition, the geometry, and the colored marble windows are all ideas I love. I’m always looking for new ideas."

Kew (on the right) and J. David, September 29

Photographs by Chris Killip of North East England reveal human resilience in a ravaged landscape.

50 images of the seaside landscapes and working-class people in the villages surrounding Newcastle were published in In Flagrante (1988) and are new acquisitions at the museum!

Read more here.

“Boo” on a Horse, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland, negative 1984; print 1987, Chris Killip. Gelatin silver print, 11 x 13 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.25.8. © Chris Killip 

“Cookie” in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland, 1985, Chris Killip. Gelatin silver print, 10 7/8 x 13 3/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.25.11. © Chris Killip

Bever, Skinningrove, North Yorkshire, 1980, Chris Killip. Gelatin silver print, 11 x 13 9/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.25.1. © Chris Killip

Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland, 1984, Chris Killip. Gelatin silver print, 10 15/16 x 13 3/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.25.10. © Chris Killip 

Taken 157 years ago to this day in 1857, this photograph is of a cavalry unit photographed in Chalons, France.
Cavalry Maneuvers, October 3, 1857, Gustave Le Gray. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Taken 157 years ago to this day in 1857, this photograph is of a cavalry unit photographed in Chalons, France.

Cavalry Maneuvers, October 3, 1857, Gustave Le Gray. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Can you tell a Rembrandt apart from his contemporaries?
What better way to test your sharp eye than at the museum? The Eye of the Connoisseur looks closely at Rembrandt’s paintings and what it takes to authenticate one. 
#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

Can you tell a Rembrandt apart from his contemporaries?

What better way to test your sharp eye than at the museum? The Eye of the Connoisseur looks closely at Rembrandt’s paintings and what it takes to authenticate one. 

#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

"Hey Dude!"

That doesn’t seem like too far off for a cry of a street vendor from the series called “Cries of Paris.

However, this is an idealized depiction of a peasant who has sturdy clogs, a short jacket, and apron. Such vision sold higher numbers of these small sculptures to wealthy patrons.

Figure of a Street Vendor, about 1755 - 1760, Mennecy Porcelain Manufactory. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Eye-to-eye with a mystery man.
He closely resembles painter Francois Boucher, whose eyes rendered paintings like this one. 
In 18th century France, terracotta busts were popular additions to the home as they were relatively inexpensive, and fit for both middle class and wealthy consumers.
See the full picture here.
Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.
Bust of a Man, about 1760, Attributed to Jean-Jacques Caffieri. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Eye-to-eye with a mystery man.

He closely resembles painter Francois Boucher, whose eyes rendered paintings like this one

In 18th century France, terracotta busts were popular additions to the home as they were relatively inexpensive, and fit for both middle class and wealthy consumers.

See the full picture here.

Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

Bust of a Man, about 1760, Attributed to Jean-Jacques Caffieri. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Drab or dynamic?

This orange-brown colored tapestry was so in fashion in the late 17th century wealthy patrons ordered matching furniture upholstery to complement this unusual shade.

The shade became known as tabac d’Espagne, or Spanish tobacco.

Tapestry: The Offering to Bacchus from The Grotesque Series, about 1690 - 1730, Beauvais Tapestry Manufactory. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Flat, clear vessels with broad areas of smooth glass were made in the 1500s to accommodate demand for enabled decoration.
This is over a foot tall, and was made to hold beer for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It was also shared on festive occasions, and noted humanist Erasmus gives this advice to his readers in On Good Manners for Boys:

"Chew your food before you drink and do not raise the cup to your lips without first wiping them with a napkin or cloth, especially if someone offers you his cup when drinking from a common cup."

Wise man.
Beaker with the Arms of Puchner (Stangenglas), 1587, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Flat, clear vessels with broad areas of smooth glass were made in the 1500s to accommodate demand for enabled decoration.

This is over a foot tall, and was made to hold beer for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It was also shared on festive occasions, and noted humanist Erasmus gives this advice to his readers in On Good Manners for Boys:

"Chew your food before you drink and do not raise the cup to your lips without first wiping them with a napkin or cloth, especially if someone offers you his cup when drinking from a common cup."

Wise man.

Beaker with the Arms of Puchner (Stangenglas), 1587, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Today is the Feast Day of St. Gabriel, aka the Archangel that brought Mary the news of her pregnancy.

He’s also the patron saint of messengers and communications workers. 

The Annunciation, about 1240, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.
The Annunciation, about 1660-1665, Godfried Schalcken. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Bust of an Angel, 1609, Hendrick Goltzius. J. Paul Getty Museum.
The Annunciation, about 1025 - 1050, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Listen carefully, you can almost hear the string instruments echoing through the galleries and through time.
Music and art go hand in hand; artists have depicted music, musicians, entertainment, theater, and sound for centuries. Page through Music in Art here.
#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

Listen carefully, you can almost hear the string instruments echoing through the galleries and through time.

Music and art go hand in hand; artists have depicted music, musicians, entertainment, theater, and sound for centuries. Page through Music in Art here.

#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

Banned Books Week—History Edition

This page was removed from the 13th-century Morgan Picture Bible. Why?

It was owned in the 1600s by Persian ruler Shah Abbas, who, it is suspected, did not approve of this story about a son’s defiance of his father.

This page shows the battle between the armies of traitoroous Absalom and his father King David, and Absalom’s death.

Zoom into the illumination: here.

Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom to read. This week we’re sharing examples of books from cultural history that have been attacked, vilified, or otherwise banned.

Scenes from the Life of Absalom, about 1250, French. J. Paul Getty Museum.

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