Justice by moonlight.

Divine Vengeance and Justice move swiftly to catch a fleeing criminal. Made as a study for a monumental painting for a criminal courtroom in the Palace of Justice in Paris, this dramatic scene certainly conveys the inspiration of Roman Poet Horace.

"Retribution rarely fails to pursue the evil man."

Justice and Divine Vengeance Pursuing Crime, about 1805 - 1806, Pierre-Paul Prud”hon. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Happy International Literacy Day!
A young Virgin Mary learns to read with the help of her mother in this illuminated completed in 1440.
Saint Anne Teaching the Virgin to Read, about 1430 - 1440, Master of Sir John Fastolf. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Happy International Literacy Day!

A young Virgin Mary learns to read with the help of her mother in this illuminated completed in 1440.

Saint Anne Teaching the Virgin to Read, about 1430 - 1440, Master of Sir John Fastolf. J. Paul Getty Museum.

She is a young woman dressed in domestic servant attire.
One of 32 images in this album of a British merchant family in Brazil from 1844 - 1865, this is one of the earliest known photographs a black person taken in Brazil.
From an album of portraits of a British merchant family, ca. 1844-53, Charles DeForest Fredericks. Getty Research Institute.

She is a young woman dressed in domestic servant attire.

One of 32 images in this album of a British merchant family in Brazil from 1844 - 1865, this is one of the earliest known photographs a black person taken in Brazil.

From an album of portraits of a British merchant family, ca. 1844-53, Charles DeForest Fredericks. Getty Research Institute.

David sets the scene as historically accurate as possible. The fashions, furniture, hairstyles and figures stage the tragic scene featuring Brutus. 

He chose this subject from Roman history to satisfy a commission from King Louis XVI, but it’s reception was much more politicized as the painting this drawing was prep for was completed the year the French Revolution began. 

Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

The Lictors Carrying Away the Bodies of the Sons of Brutus, 1787, Jacques-Louis David. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A casual flip through Nature and Its Symbols reveals the not-so-shocking history of artists finding inspiration in our natural world. We caught this book hiding in the Central Garden here.
#NowReading is a series with gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art. 

A casual flip through Nature and Its Symbols reveals the not-so-shocking history of artists finding inspiration in our natural world. We caught this book hiding in the Central Garden here.

#NowReading is a series with gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art. 

May I have this dance?
A dancing Peruvian couple from an album of 101 watercolor sketches detailing the “costumes” of Lima.
Dancing Couple, 1860, Unknown. Getty Research Institute.

May I have this dance?

A dancing Peruvian couple from an album of 101 watercolor sketches detailing the “costumes” of Lima.

Dancing Couple, 1860, Unknown. Getty Research Institute.

A cotton-candy sky paints the setting for Veronese’s depiction of the baptism of Christ.

The Baptism of Christ, 1580 - 1588, Paolo Veronese. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Eye-to-eye with a young cotton-mill worker.
A girl no older than 13 stands against a loom. She and the many children she worked with in unacceptable conditions were photographed by Lewis Hine on assignment from the National Child Labor Committee. 
See the full picture here.
Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.
Cotton-Mill Worker, North Carolina, 1908, Lewis Wickes Hine. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Eye-to-eye with a young cotton-mill worker.

A girl no older than 13 stands against a loom. She and the many children she worked with in unacceptable conditions were photographed by Lewis Hine on assignment from the National Child Labor Committee. 

See the full picture here.

Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

Cotton-Mill Worker, North Carolina, 1908, Lewis Wickes Hine. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Curator Scott Allan on "The Scandalous Art of James Ensor"

"A warm wind is blowing over Los Angeles, it’s not a Santa Ana. Rather, it blows straight from bowels of burlesque Belgian wizard James Ensor." —Curator of Paintings, Scott Allan 

The only talk you’ll ever need to hear on James Ensor.

The Scandalous Art of James Ensor closes September 7 at the Getty Center.

Hiss is a snake bracelet from the 1st century A.D.

Designed to look like a coil around the wearer, this would have been worn in a pair on the wrist or upper arm. A tinier head appears coming from the snake’s tail. Look closely.

Snake Bracelet, A.D. 1 - 100, Romano-Egyptian. J. Paul Getty Museum.

September, the month to harvest grapes, isn’t just for the modern Virgo.

Libras and Scorpios are in on the labors of plowing and sowing fun for the month. Since the Middle Ages the zodiac symbols have shifted with changes in the months of the calendar. 

Zodiacal Sign of Virgo, about 1170s, Unknown. German, Hildesheim. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Woman Harvesting Grapes; Zodiacal Sign of a Libra
A Man Treading Grapes; Zodiacal Sign of Libra, early 1460s, Workshop of Willem Vrelant. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Plowing and Sowing; Zodiacal Sign of Scorpio, 1510-1520, Workshop of Master of James IV of Scotland. J. Paul Getty Museum.

12 Months, 12 Labors, 12 Zodiacal Signs

January — Aquarius — Feasting and Warming
February — Pisces —Working in a Vineyard
March — Aries —Pruning Trees or Digging
April —Taurus — Farming, Milking Animals and Butter-making
May — Gemini — Music-Making
June — Cancer — Sheepshearing 
July — Leo — Mowing
August — Virgo — Reaping
September — Scorpio — Plowing and Sowing
October — Libra — Slaughtering an Ox
November — Sagittarius — Threshing and Pig Feeding
December — Capricorn — Slaughtering of Pigs

Illuminations from the Spinola Hours showcase the labors of the months. September is for plowing, sowing and harvesting grapes.


…”the clarity of the cold carnation of old skin, the creases of the smile, the folds made by the passage of time; the powerful pleating of the forehead…”

The detail of his wrinkles, blood vessels, and moles is a realistic rendering uncommon in formal portraiture of the time. This was made by a friend.
Portrait of Louis de Silvestre, about 1753, Maurice-Quentin de la Tour. J. Paul Getty Museum.

…”the clarity of the cold carnation of old skin, the creases of the smile, the folds made by the passage of time; the powerful pleating of the forehead…”

The detail of his wrinkles, blood vessels, and moles is a realistic rendering uncommon in formal portraiture of the time. This was made by a friend.

Portrait of Louis de Silvestre, about 1753, Maurice-Quentin de la Tour. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Touched by an angel. Or demon.
The 16th-century alchemist and mathematician John Dee spent years documenting his conversations with what he believed to be angels.
40 years after his death, the scholar Méric Causabon published Dee’s records, arguing that Dee had been talking to evil spirits all along. So what are you reading this weekend? Title page from “A True and Faithful Relation …,” 1659, Méric Causabon. Getty Research Institute.

Touched by an angel. Or demon.

The 16th-century alchemist and mathematician John Dee spent years documenting his conversations with what he believed to be angels.

40 years after his death, the scholar Méric Causabon published Dee’s records, arguing that Dee had been talking to evil spirits all along. So what are you reading this weekend? 

Title page from “A True and Faithful Relation …,” 1659, Méric Causabon. Getty Research Institute.

Wine opener? 
It’s an auger, a tool used to bore holes in the supporting timbers of bridges for the placement of explosives.
Quite the subtle still life for such an dangerous device.
Auger on a Blanket, July 1863, Andrew Joseph Russell. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Wine opener? 

It’s an auger, a tool used to bore holes in the supporting timbers of bridges for the placement of explosives.

Quite the subtle still life for such an dangerous device.

Auger on a Blanket, July 1863, Andrew Joseph Russell. J. Paul Getty Museum.

note: loading more posts will reset any filters applied
More