supercalifragilisticly:

Got helped by a very nice girl to finish this task for the #gettyscavangerhunt #gettycollegenight (at The Getty Museum, Los Angeles)

supercalifragilisticly:

Got helped by a very nice girl to finish this task for the #gettyscavangerhunt #gettycollegenight (at The Getty Museum, Los Angeles)

More thoughts on last night’s Game of Thrones from our Medieval manuscripts curator:

"You thought the human…erm…munchies in last night’s Two Swords was bad? 
Well, cannibalism between enemies is one thing, but when a mother is forced to eat her own child as seen in this illuminated manuscript, it’s medieval desperation at its worst!” 

Yikes!

More thoughts on last night’s Game of Thrones from our Medieval manuscripts curator:

"You thought the human…erm…munchies in last night’s Two Swords was bad?

Well, cannibalism between enemies is one thing, but when a mother is forced to eat her own child as seen in this illuminated manuscript, it’s medieval desperation at its worst!” 

Yikes!

Winter is coming. All men must die. And Game of Thrones is back!

Stay tuned each week as we unpack Sunday’s episodes through medieval masterpieces.

The season premiere didn’t waste any time jumping right into the action. We had a typical, sizzling brothel scenea tense arrival of foreigners, some hearty, growing teenage dragons; a bloody tavern fight, the fitting of a golden hand; and some creepy crucifixion-like deaths, pointing toward something much darker down the road.

Advice from our curator: Joffrey, the next time you manhandle a rare and expensive manuscript containing the deeds of your Kingsguard, make sure to do so with clean hands. Saves some time for our conservators later. (And doesn’t the White Book scream Flower of Battle?)

Drama. Politics. Romance. Bloodshed. Dragons. Medieval Times.

These are not just descriptors of our illuminated manuscripts, but also celebratory words to commemorate the return of Game of Thrones!

Stay tuned each week as we unpack Sunday’s episodes through medieval masterpieces.

All Men Must Die.

Expressive ink lines bring this marine scene to life.
For even more intense detail, check out the centaur statues that decorate the upper deck of the ship in port.
A Ship in Port with a Ruined Obelisk, about 1650-1655, Pierre Puget. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Expressive ink lines bring this marine scene to life.

For even more intense detail, check out the centaur statues that decorate the upper deck of the ship in port.

A Ship in Port with a Ruined Obelisk, about 1650-1655, Pierre Puget. J. Paul Getty Museum.


“And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?Come to my arms, my beamish boy!O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”He chortled in his joy.

Photography and poem by Lewis Carroll
Full poem here→ http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/171647Saint George and the Dragon, by Lewis Carroll, 1875. Albumen silver print. J. Paul Getty Museum.

“And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”
He chortled in his joy.

Photography and poem by Lewis Carroll

Full poem here→ http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/171647

Saint George and the Dragon, by Lewis Carroll, 1875. Albumen silver print. J. Paul Getty Museum.

The wife and the daughter of the Nepalese prime minister during the early years of photography. 

From the Getty Research Institute’s collection of “Portraits of women from the court of Nepal.”

[Portrait of Hiranyagarbha Kumari, detail], about 1870. Hand-colored albumen print. Getty Research Institute.
[Portrait of Lalit Kumari, detail], about 1870. Hand-colored albumen print. Getty Research Institute.

The Annunciation through the lens of a 17th century Dutch painter. 

The Annunciation, about 1660-1665, Godfried Schalcken. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Tumblr Pro since the advent of photography.

Portrait of a Man, about 1854, Unknown maker. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Portrait of a Man Reading a Newspaper, about 1842, John Plumbe, Jr. J. Paul Getty Museum.
[Portrait of an Asian Man in Top Hat], about 1856, James P. Weston. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Inspired by the success of the Open Content Program, which provides free access to over 10,000 artwork images for any purpose, the Getty is pleased to announce the launch of the world’s first art history cologne, Eau d’Open.
With a base of parchment and pottery sherds, tempered by high notes of varnish, Sèvres porcelain, and Renaissance typography, the unisex fragrance will begin shipping from the Getty Store by May 1, with free digital download planned for later this year.
More on the release: here!
Mischief and Repose (detail, with perfume bottle added), 1895, John William Godward. Oil on canvas, 23 x 51 1/2 in. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Inspired by the success of the Open Content Program, which provides free access to over 10,000 artwork images for any purpose, the Getty is pleased to announce the launch of the world’s first art history cologne, Eau d’Open.

With a base of parchment and pottery sherds, tempered by high notes of varnish, Sèvres porcelain, and Renaissance typography, the unisex fragrance will begin shipping from the Getty Store by May 1, with free digital download planned for later this year.

More on the release: here!

Mischief and Repose (detail, with perfume bottle added), 1895, John William Godward. Oil on canvas, 23 x 51 1/2 in. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Inner-City Arts nestles in the warehouse district of downtown L.A. like a lustrous pearl in an oyster. Amidst poverty, homelessness, and acres of concrete, it’s an oasis of creative potential.
We’re proud to volunteer for and support this wonderful organization, which has brought the joy of art-making to over 150,000 kids—and counting.
Inner-City Arts nestles in the warehouse district of downtown L.A. like a lustrous pearl in an oyster. Amidst poverty, homelessness, and acres of concrete, it’s an oasis of creative potential.

We’re proud to volunteer for and support this wonderful organization, which has brought the joy of art-making to over 150,000 kids—and counting.

The flowing red robes of an ambassador to the Pope.
Portrait of Agostino Pallavinici, 1621-1623, Anthony van Dyck. J. Paul Getty Museum.

The flowing red robes of an ambassador to the Pope.

Portrait of Agostino Pallavinici, 1621-1623, Anthony van Dyck. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Books?
Rather, a book-shaped box that holds stereographic views of Italy. 
Stereographs in a book-shaped box, ca. 1990, Underwood and Underwood. Getty Research Institute.

Books?

Rather, a book-shaped box that holds stereographic views of Italy. 

Stereographs in a book-shaped box, ca. 1990, Underwood and Underwood. Getty Research Institute.

A conscious effort to align photography with the more traditional fine art medium of painting. 
Still Life with Fruit and Decanter, 1860, Roger Fenton. Albumen print. J. Paul Getty Museum.

A conscious effort to align photography with the more traditional fine art medium of painting. 

Still Life with Fruit and Decanter, 1860, Roger Fenton. Albumen print. J. Paul Getty Museum.

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