"Everything changes, even stone."  —Monet

The colors of Rouen Cathedral in morning light in 1894.

"Everything changes, even stone."  Monet

The colors of Rouen Cathedral in morning light in 1894.

Walking through history.

Walking through history.

It’s National Library Week!

Visit the Getty Research Institute’s RSS feed at the Internet Archive. We scan and upload thousands of texts a month, including this recent addition, “Les Types de Paris,” a 19th-century book featuring drawings and writings about “typical” Parisians.

Illustrations from “Les Types de Paris,” 1889, Edmond de Goncourt (author) and Jean-François Raffaëlli (artist). Getty Research Institute.

Another gruesome manuscript match up based on last night’s Game of Thrones from our Medieval manuscripts curator:

"Last week it was cannibalism, this week it’s death by fire. We saw supposed heretics burned at the stake to satisfy the fire god, the Lord of Light (or at least his uber-creepy, crimson-clad priestess).
In this illumination, even knights aren’t untouchable to the torch. The Pope crushed the chivalric order and after a series of confessions, the grand master of the Knights Templar was burned as a heretic.”

Heated tempers all around.

Another gruesome manuscript match up based on last night’s Game of Thrones from our Medieval manuscripts curator:

"Last week it was cannibalism, this week it’s death by fire. We saw supposed heretics burned at the stake to satisfy the fire god, the Lord of Light (or at least his uber-creepy, crimson-clad priestess).

In this illumination, even knights aren’t untouchable to the torch. The Pope crushed the chivalric order and after a series of confessions, the grand master of the Knights Templar was burned as a heretic.”

Heated tempers all around.

Winter is coming. All men must die. And Game of Thrones is back!
Stay tuned each week as we unpack Sunday’s episodes through medieval masterpieces.

A lot happened in this super intense episode! What did we learn? Weddings, sadistic human hunts, and burning heretics never end well; perplexing visions of crows and apocalyptic omens flying above a key city somehow make sense to a young paraplegic; the flirty exchange of glances between two handsome princes does not go unnoticed, especially by one’s future wife’s brother-lover; fools can come to the rescue in a time of need; and even though Joffrey may have cut up a book, the writing of his legacy was already on the wall…

This beautiful photochrom print of Marshall Pass in Colorado features a sign of the changing times. Made in the 1880s, it depicts an early moment during the westward move by settlers. 
Can you spot the billowing steam engine?

This beautiful photochrom print of Marshall Pass in Colorado features a sign of the changing times. Made in the 1880s, it depicts an early moment during the westward move by settlers. 

Can you spot the billowing steam engine?

You could easy stare at this work for five minutes. This painting is incredibly detailed and only about the size of a laptop screen. Tiny figures sell pretzels, hold weird demonic-looking babies (not an art historical term!), ignore the serman, suspiciously glance at each other, and seamlessly fade into the crowd. Jesus is present too, can you spot him?

Recommended viewing for slowartday from our social media coordinator, Sarah.

To zoom in and let your “eyes” wander, click here

The Sermon on the Mount, 1598, Jan Brueghel the Elder. J. Paul Getty Museum.

"Spend five minutes with this nine-foot-tall vase. Look for the army of snails with their little horns, all different one from another, featured with such naturalism at the very bottom: it appears they are climbing in slow motion, inching along to the top. And so should you, with your eyes.

Look in a spiral and move around, up, and down to jump into a fantastic symbolist universe where you’ll discover a spider, a strange batman, lace, ribbons, the signature of the artist, the date of the piece, and the foundry mark of the Brussels foundry. Only a slow viewing allows you to appreciate the incredible twisting of the handles or the details of the peacock feathers at the very top.”

Recommended viewing for slowartday from our decorative arts & sculpture curator, Anne-Lise Desmas.

To zoom in and let your “eyes” wander, click here.

Vase (detail), 1889, Jean-Desire Ringel d’Illzach. Bronze and copper, 107 1/2 x 40 9/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

"Spend five minutes with Joseph Chinard’s Madame Récamier. Three reasons why: 1. the virtuosity of Chinard’s lifelike carving in terracotta; 2. the sitter’s allure, which is open to interpretation—is she coy or demure?; and 3. the renown of historical beauty Juliette Récamier herself. (I’ve looked at this sculpture for many, many minutes and written about it here.)” 

Recommended viewing for slowartday from a passionate decorative arts & sculpture educator, Christine Spier.

To zoom in and let your “eyes” wander, click here.

Bust of Madame Recamier (detail), about 1801–02, Joseph Chinard. Terracotta, 24 7/8 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

"Spend five minutes with the Italian choir book featured in the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Byzantine Illumination at the Cultural Crossroads. It is one of the largest manuscripts in the Museum’s collection, but the intricacy of its pages is what I find compelling. The Latin words, the musical notation, the form of the letter “h” that encloses the scene of the Nativity, the monumental form of the Virgin, and the humble ox and donkey peeking over the edge of the manger at the Christ Child—all combine to remind me of why I love manuscripts.” 

Recommended viewing for slowartday from our manuscripts curator, Elizabeth Morrison.

To zoom in and let your “eyes” wanter, click here.

Initial H: The Nativity (detail) in an Antiphonal, late 1200s, Master of Gerona. J. Paul Getty Museum.

"Spend five minutes with this sarcophagus and you’ll witness a whole night—and a passionate one at that. Zeus, somewhat put out because Selene (goddess of the moon) had fallen in love with the mortal Endymion, cast the beautiful young man into an eternal sleep. But that didn’t stop Selene from visiting her beloved every night. You can see her at the center of this sarcophagus as darkness falls, stepping off from her chariot. But as you look to the right, beyond the slumbering Endymion, the next day begins to dawn (too soon!), and the horses must rush the goddess of the moon away, until the next evening’s amorous encounter." 

Recommended viewing for slowartday from our antiquities curator, David Saunders.

To zoom in and let your “eyes” wander, click here.

Sarcophagus panel (detail), about A.D. 210, Roman. Marble, 84 1/4 in. long x 21 3/8 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 


It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see. —Henry David Thoreau

Tomorrow is slowartday! For how to get involved IRL, check out their site.
Online, check back tomorrow for some high-res eye candy. Our curators and educators picked out some beautiful artworks to share with you digitally.
All will have zoomable options so you can soak in every part of these detailed masterpieces.
Look long, look slow! 

It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see. 
—Henry David Thoreau

Tomorrow is slowartday! For how to get involved IRL, check out their site.

Online, check back tomorrow for some high-res eye candy. Our curators and educators picked out some beautiful artworks to share with you digitally.

All will have zoomable options so you can soak in every part of these detailed masterpieces.

Look long, look slow! 


We cannot know his legendary head with eyes like ripening fruit. And yet his torso is still suffused with brilliance from inside, like a lamp, in which his gaze, now turned to low, gleams in all its power. Otherwise the curved breast could not dazzle you so, nor could a smile run through the placid hips and thighs to that dark center where procreation flared.Otherwise this stone would seem defaced beneath the translucent cascade of the shoulders and would not glisten like a wild beast’s fur: would not, from all the borders of itself, burst like a star: for here there is no place that does not see you. You must change your life. 
Archaic Torso of Apollo by Rainer Maria Rilke

Apollo Crowning Himself, 1781, Antonio Canova. J. Paul Getty Museum.

We cannot know his legendary head with eyes like ripening fruit. And yet his torso is still suffused with brilliance from inside, like a lamp, in which his gaze, now turned to low, 

gleams in all its power. Otherwise the curved breast could not dazzle you so, nor could a smile run through the placid hips and thighs to that dark center where procreation flared.

Otherwise this stone would seem defaced beneath the translucent cascade of the shoulders and would not glisten like a wild beast’s fur: 

would not, from all the borders of itself, burst like a star: for here there is no place that does not see you. You must change your life. 

Archaic Torso of Apollo by Rainer Maria Rilke

Apollo Crowning Himself, 1781, Antonio Canova. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Byzantine jewelry completely opposes the church’s condemnation of excessive luxury.

But these pieces stand as a testament to Byzantine affluence, social habits, and technical achievements of their cosmopolitan culture.

Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections now open!

#NowOnView

Necklace, 4th century. Marion, Cyprus, Greece.. Image courtesy of the Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens, no. Z.438.1 
Bracelets, 9th–10th century. Constantinople, Turkey. Image courtesy of the Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki


I was angry with my friend; I told my wrath, my wrath did end.I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow. 

Poem and painting by William Blake.Full poem here→ http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/175222Satan Exulting over Eve, 1795, William Blake. Graphite, pen and black ink, and watercolor.

I was angry with my friend; 
I told my wrath, my wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe: 
I told it not, my wrath did grow. 

Poem and painting by William Blake.

Full poem here→ http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/175222

Satan Exulting over Eve, 1795, William Blake. Graphite, pen and black ink, and watercolor.

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