Dressed in the finest 17th century fashions, a woman personifying September shops the local market.

This sketch of September, the rich landscape, and bountiful harvest were made for paintings of the months for Elector Maximilian I of Bavaria for a dining hall in his Munich palace.

Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume in the Getty collection.

Personification of September, about 1644, Joachim von Sandrart. J. Paul Getty Museum.

On this day in history, the cornerstone of the United States Capitol was laid by George Washington in 1793.

Since then, the Capitol has been rebuilt and expanded dramatically (by no less than four different architects).

This daguerreotype is from a trio of images by John Plumbe, Jr. that form the first photographic record of the site.

The United States Capitol, 1846, John Plumbe, Jr. J. Paul Getty Museum. 

The Renaissance garden was seen as paradise on Earth. A place to get away, a place to meet, to tell stories, to hold secrets, to enjoy nature and more. Conveniently Gardens of the Renaissance is the perfect book to hideaway with in any garden, even at the Getty Center. 
#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

The Renaissance garden was seen as paradise on Earth. A place to get away, a place to meet, to tell stories, to hold secrets, to enjoy nature and more. Conveniently Gardens of the Renaissance is the perfect book to hideaway with in any garden, even at the Getty Center

#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

He was also a bit idiosyncratic. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

Happy accession, My Lord!

Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

She’s young, she’s vulnerable, she’s uncertain. 
She’s a young girl facing the outside world scaled for grown-ups. The daughter of a composer, a friend of the artist, is depicted here in an off-balanced porch, in front of a closed door, with quite the haunting gaze.
See the full picture here.
Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.
Jeanne Kefer, 1885, Fernand Khnopff. J. Paul Getty Museum.

She’s young, she’s vulnerable, she’s uncertain. 

She’s a young girl facing the outside world scaled for grown-ups. The daughter of a composer, a friend of the artist, is depicted here in an off-balanced porch, in front of a closed door, with quite the haunting gaze.

See the full picture here.

Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

Jeanne Kefer, 1885, Fernand Khnopff. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Tomorrow, September 17, from 10 AM to 4 PM (PST) we’ve got curators on tap to answer any question you have for them.
Tweet @GettyMuseum using #AskACurator and fire away.
Details on who you’re talking to and what their expertise is here. 

Tomorrow, September 17, from 10 AM to 4 PM (PST) we’ve got curators on tap to answer any question you have for them.

Tweet @GettyMuseum using #AskACurator and fire away.

Details on who you’re talking to and what their expertise is here

192 square feet of luxurious wool and silk weaving.

Notice the glow of the chandelier, achieved with lighter threading and great skill. Knights, monkeys, dogs and sheep escape the tapestry into our world.

This detailed hanging depicts the dangerous of bad eating habits and overindulgence. The bearded man is not a wizard, but rather a doctor. 

Woven at Gobelins Tapestry Manufactory; after a painting by Charles Antoine Coypel, painter, 1770 - 1772, French. J. Paul Getty Museum.

7 swords, 7 sorrows, 7 tragic events related to Christ’s life and death.

Today is the Feast of the Virgin of Sorrows, and in this illumination we see the seven events in Christ’s life that brought Mary her sorrow.

The Seven Sorrows of the Virgin, about 1525 - 1530, Simon Bening. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Trois crayons, or three-colored chalk, was a technique Watteau may have learned by studying drawings by Peter Paul Rubens.

Made to study the movement of this woman’s costume, Watteau kept hundreds of drawings together as a reference for any composition. The central figure appears in Embarkation for Cythera at the Louvre. 

Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

Studies of Three Women, about 1716-1717, Jean-Antoine Watteau. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Observing the lines and forms in our built environment has been a part of photography’s history since the start. Flip through Architecture in Photographs here.

#NowReading is a series with gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

Eye-to-eye with a member of the Roman cavalry. This mask, a part of a larger helmet, may represent Aphrodite, Artemis or even Apollo. This elaborate mask would have been used ceremonially.
See the full picture here.
Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.
Mask from a Cavalry Helmet, A.D. 75 - 125, Unknown. Roman. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Eye-to-eye with a member of the Roman cavalry. This mask, a part of a larger helmet, may represent Aphrodite, Artemis or even Apollo. This elaborate mask would have been used ceremonially.

See the full picture here.

Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

Mask from a Cavalry Helmet, A.D. 75 - 125, Unknown. Roman. J. Paul Getty Museum.

zoeblue:

The Information Desk at the Getty Center.

Where the journey through time begins.

zoeblue:

The Information Desk at the Getty Center.

Where the journey through time begins.

Justice by moonlight.

Divine Vengeance and Justice move swiftly to catch a fleeing criminal. Made as a study for a monumental painting for a criminal courtroom in the Palace of Justice in Paris, this dramatic scene certainly conveys the inspiration of Roman Poet Horace.

"Retribution rarely fails to pursue the evil man."

Justice and Divine Vengeance Pursuing Crime, about 1805 - 1806, Pierre-Paul Prud”hon. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Happy International Literacy Day!
A young Virgin Mary learns to read with the help of her mother in this illuminated completed in 1440.
Saint Anne Teaching the Virgin to Read, about 1430 - 1440, Master of Sir John Fastolf. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Happy International Literacy Day!

A young Virgin Mary learns to read with the help of her mother in this illuminated completed in 1440.

Saint Anne Teaching the Virgin to Read, about 1430 - 1440, Master of Sir John Fastolf. J. Paul Getty Museum.

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