Painted in 1632, separated 1927, and reunited today, these paintings of this man and his wife live together in the collection.

His smize tells all.

Portrait of a Man, 1632, Nicolaes Eliasz Pickenoy. Dutch. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Did humans have eyes that close together in ancient times?
Naaaah, this helmet is ceremonial, most like for a funerary purpose. Once adorned with horsehair, feathers or metal animal horns, this decorative helmet was certainly not functional.
Did you notice the engraved ringlet curls at the helmet’s ‘hairline’?
Helmet, 400 - 375 B.C., Greek. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Did humans have eyes that close together in ancient times?

Naaaah, this helmet is ceremonial, most like for a funerary purpose. Once adorned with horsehair, feathers or metal animal horns, this decorative helmet was certainly not functional.

Did you notice the engraved ringlet curls at the helmet’s ‘hairline’?

Helmet, 400 - 375 B.C., Greek. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Mischievous monkey (sans wings), a tin man (or rather bronze) who needs a bit of oil, a derpy and cowardly lion, a wand-wielding shady witch, the scarecrow in pre-human form, angry Totos, and a little Dorothy at a junction in Kansas.

Look familiar? All the makings of art history’s version of Wizard of Oz, which debuted on this day in 1939.

*Click click click*

A Monkey, about 1270, Franco-Flemish. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Dancing Faun, 1722 - 1724, Pietro Cipriani. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Rattle in the Shape of a Lion, about 600 - 575 B.C., Greek. J. Paul Getty Museum.
The Shade of Samuel Invoked by Saul, about 1650 - 1656, Bernardo Cavallino. J. Paul Getty Museum.
A Summer Scene, 1787, Hendrik Meyer. J. Paul Getty Museum.
A Hunter and Dogs Pursuing a Fallow Deer, about 1430 - 1440. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Group at Junction, Kansas, 1867, Alexander Gardner. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Portrait of Louis XIV, after 1701, Workshop of Hyacinthe Rigaud. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Two elegantly dressed men, a courtier on the left and flutist on the right, come to life through small, strong strokes.

Using flicking motions with red, black and white chalk, the artist creates a loose, ethereal and lively moment between two fancy pants.

Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

Two Seated Men, about 1740, Nicolas Lancret. J. Paul Getty Museum.

chivalry-project:

Intellect is the best weapon.

Chess Problems, late 1300s, in Book of Chess Problems. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XV 15, fol. 31.

This page on view at the Getty July 8–September 21, 2014.

Your move. 

Next chance to add your illumination to The Chivalry Project? Tomorrow, drop in between 11am and 3pm

Flower Power!

On this day, in 1969, over 400,000 people came out for “Three Days of Peace and Music” at what is now the iconic Woodstock Festival. 

In honor of the 45th anniversary, we looked at our own wood stock and found this beautiful 18th century limewood relief. Groovy!

Carved Relief, Aubert-Henri-Joseph Parent, 1789, French. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Stand by me.
While the music stand came into popular use during the 14th century, it was during the latter half of the 18th century that they became highly specialized to the user’s need.
This elegant stand would have easily fit in with the luxurious decor of a salon, and features candle holders which allowed concerts to go on well into the night.
Music Stand, Martin Carlin, 1770-1775, J. Paul Getty Museum.

Stand by me.

While the music stand came into popular use during the 14th century, it was during the latter half of the 18th century that they became highly specialized to the user’s need.

This elegant stand would have easily fit in with the luxurious decor of a salon, and features candle holders which allowed concerts to go on well into the night.

Music Stand, Martin Carlin, 1770-1775, J. Paul Getty Museum.

This is a zebu, known today as a Brahma bull.
Images of zebus and elephants represented connections to India, the farthest reach of Alexander the Great’s expansive empire.
Zebu, 200 - 150 B.C., Greek, Seleucia Pieria (in present-day Turkey). J. Paul Getty Museum. Gift of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman.

This is a zebu, known today as a Brahma bull.

Images of zebus and elephants represented connections to India, the farthest reach of Alexander the Great’s expansive empire.

Zebu, 200 - 150 B.C., Greek, Seleucia Pieria (in present-day Turkey). J. Paul Getty Museum. Gift of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman.

"Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us, or we find it not." 

—Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Art”.

The Perseid meteor shower is upon us!

Every year in mid-August, the Perseids seems to fly out of the constellation Perseus. Perseus, a Greek hero, is depicted here on his vase mid-pursuit of the winged gorgons.

Behave during this time, gorgons, or you might soon be missing your head.

Ladle with Perseus Chasing Gorgons, about 510 - 500 B.C., Attributed to the Theseus Painter. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Hesione who? 

Herakles rescues a king’s daughter, Hesione, from a raging sea monster sent by a spurned Poseidon. The myth mimics the well-known story of Perseus and Andromeda, but was never as popular in art and literature.

You can just see Herakles battling the monster at the bottom left of this ancient fresco. 

Fresco Fragment with Herakles and Hesione, about A.D. 70, Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Louvre over!
On this day in 1793, the former royal residence was converted and opened to the public as Musée Central des Arts by the revolutionary government. The iconographic glass pyramid wasn’t added until 1989.
Today, the Louvre welcomes around 9 million guests every year.
Pavilion Mollien, the Louvre, Gustav Le Gray, 1859. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Louvre over!

On this day in 1793, the former royal residence was converted and opened to the public as Musée Central des Arts by the revolutionary government. The iconographic glass pyramid wasn’t added until 1989.

Today, the Louvre welcomes around 9 million guests every year.

Pavilion Mollien, the Louvre, Gustav Le Gray, 1859. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Weekend concerts continue here at the Getty with our Garden Concerts for Kids this Saturday and Sunday.

Humanity has enjoyed live music in gardens for centuries. And kids should be in on the fun.

Music in the Garden in Romance of the Rose, French, 1405. The J. Paul Getty Museum

The buttery textures of these French socialites’ gowns glisten with finery and riches. The woman in the middle, pregnant with her first, listens to the calming advice of her friends. 

Part of a series, this drawing reflects ideals of social and moral behavior in the upper classes of the 1700s. Dressed in the finest clothing with the most contemporary of hairstyles, these women chat and lounge in a perfect domestic setting.

Ahhh, the life.

"Have No Fear, My Good Friend," 1775, Jean-Michel Moreau le jeune. J. Paul Getty Museum.


Participants in the fête galante seemed uninhibited by the stiff conventions of formal society. 

Much like the Rococo fête galante, today’s modern music festivals feature a shrugging-off of inhibitions in favor of fun. 
Dance before a Fountain, Nicolas Lancret, 1721, The J. Paul Getty Museum

Participants in the fête galante seemed uninhibited by the stiff conventions of formal society. 

Much like the Rococo fête galante, today’s modern music festivals feature a shrugging-off of inhibitions in favor of fun. 

Dance before a Fountain, Nicolas Lancret, 1721, The J. Paul Getty Museum

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