12 Months, 12 Labors, 12 Zodiacal Signs

January — Aquarius — Feasting and Warming
February — Pisces —Working in a Vineyard
March — Aries —Pruning Trees or Digging
April —Taurus — Farming, Milking Animals and Butter-making
May — Gemini — Music-Making
June — Cancer — Sheepshearing 
July — Leo — Mowing
August — Virgo — Reaping
September — Scorpio — Plowing and Sowing
October — Libra — Slaughtering an Ox
November — Sagittarius — Threshing and Pig Feeding
December — Capricorn — Slaughtering of Pigs

Illuminations from the Spinola Hours showcase the labors of the months. September is for plowing, sowing and harvesting grapes.


…”the clarity of the cold carnation of old skin, the creases of the smile, the folds made by the passage of time; the powerful pleating of the forehead…”

The detail of his wrinkles, blood vessels, and moles is a realistic rendering uncommon in formal portraiture of the time. This was made by a friend.
Portrait of Louis de Silvestre, about 1753, Maurice-Quentin de la Tour. J. Paul Getty Museum.

…”the clarity of the cold carnation of old skin, the creases of the smile, the folds made by the passage of time; the powerful pleating of the forehead…”

The detail of his wrinkles, blood vessels, and moles is a realistic rendering uncommon in formal portraiture of the time. This was made by a friend.

Portrait of Louis de Silvestre, about 1753, Maurice-Quentin de la Tour. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Touched by an angel. Or demon.
The 16th-century alchemist and mathematician John Dee spent years documenting his conversations with what he believed to be angels.
40 years after his death, the scholar Méric Causabon published Dee’s records, arguing that Dee had been talking to evil spirits all along. So what are you reading this weekend? Title page from “A True and Faithful Relation …,” 1659, Méric Causabon. Getty Research Institute.

Touched by an angel. Or demon.

The 16th-century alchemist and mathematician John Dee spent years documenting his conversations with what he believed to be angels.

40 years after his death, the scholar Méric Causabon published Dee’s records, arguing that Dee had been talking to evil spirits all along. So what are you reading this weekend? 

Title page from “A True and Faithful Relation …,” 1659, Méric Causabon. Getty Research Institute.

It’s only temporary!

We’re saying “see you later” to Modern Rome as it travels abroad to reunite with its sibling paintings at the first major retrospective of Turner’s late work.

#LateTurner

Wine opener? 
It’s an auger, a tool used to bore holes in the supporting timbers of bridges for the placement of explosives.
Quite the subtle still life for such an dangerous device.
Auger on a Blanket, July 1863, Andrew Joseph Russell. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Wine opener? 

It’s an auger, a tool used to bore holes in the supporting timbers of bridges for the placement of explosives.

Quite the subtle still life for such an dangerous device.

Auger on a Blanket, July 1863, Andrew Joseph Russell. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Organic rolling hills and a big dreamy sky to complement a dazzling seascape by William A. Garnet. A flip through the book here.

Now Reading: Landscape in Photographs
Mood: Wanderlusting
Where? Terrace by the Getty Research Institute

#NowReading is a series with gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art. 


What were you looking at?
"I thought this painting was of a little girl. But I learned he’s a boy.”
Yes, he’s very fancy.
"His fancy clothing that tells us he’s royalty!"

Pro art sleuths in the making!
Elizabeth, Madeline, Katie, and Jack, July 8, 2014.

What were you looking at?

"I thought this painting was of a little girl. But I learned he’s a boy.”

Yes, he’s very fancy.

"His fancy clothing that tells us he’s royalty!"

Pro art sleuths in the making!

Elizabeth, Madeline, Katie, and Jack, July 8, 2014.

ryanlintelman:

thegetty:

On this day in history, a British colonial magistrate in India began using fingerprints as identifiers. It is considered the first official use of nature’s signature.
Can you find the painter’s accidental fingerprint on this Classical Athenian mug fragment? Click through for a close up!

Are you kidding me, Getty? This post is about the fingerprint on this mug? How about WHAT THE F**K IS THIS GUY DOING?

Good point. We asked our antiquities expert and here’s what he said!

ryanlintelman:

thegetty:

On this day in history, a British colonial magistrate in India began using fingerprints as identifiers. It is considered the first official use of nature’s signature.

Can you find the painter’s accidental fingerprint on this Classical Athenian mug fragment? Click through for a close up!

Are you kidding me, Getty? This post is about the fingerprint on this mug? How about WHAT THE F**K IS THIS GUY DOING?

Good point. We asked our antiquities expert and here’s what he said!

From South Pole explorers to trusty companions, dogs throughout art history are just barking adorable. 

#NationalDogDay

Vida, about 1912, Herbert G. Ponting. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Shepherd with His Dog, about 1795, Johann Jakob Wilhelm Spangler. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Gravestone of Helena, about A.D. 150 - 200, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Vessel with Youths and Their Dogs, about 490 B.C., Kleophrades Painter. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Dogs, about 1250 - 1260, Unknown. English. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Art changes the world.
A journey into Yellowstone Valley required days of arduous travel via rail stagecoach and mule train in the 1870s.  Moved by images like this one by Jackson, the government designated the area a national park in 1872.
Today is the 98th Birthday of the National Parks Service.
Old Faithful, 1870, William Henry Jackson. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Art changes the world.

A journey into Yellowstone Valley required days of arduous travel via rail stagecoach and mule train in the 1870s.  Moved by images like this one by Jackson, the government designated the area a national park in 1872.

Today is the 98th Birthday of the National Parks Service.

Old Faithful, 1870, William Henry Jackson. J. Paul Getty Museum.

This faithful pup naps during the long exposure. Now that’s trust. 
Portrait of a Seated Young Woman and Dog, 1845 - 1847, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

This faithful pup naps during the long exposure. Now that’s trust. 

Portrait of a Seated Young Woman and Dog, 1845 - 1847, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Today is the anniversary of the fateful eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79.

Here are engravings of lava rocks and curious stones picked up on Mount Vesuvius in the 18th Century. 

Ribbons and colors and gold, oh my!

Zoom in and scroll around here.

Inhabited Initial B, 1153, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum. 

This is a portrait of a prisoner.

A political prisoner at the time of the Reign of Terror in France, Andre-Antoine Bernard here is posed and styled with severity and strength. He was eventually exiled for voting to execute Louis XVI. But this defiant portrait lives on.

Portrait of Andre-Antoine Bernard, July 24, 1795, Jacques-Louis David. J. Paul Getty Museum.

The idealized countryside painted by a native city dweller.

This light and color study wasn’t meant for exhibition, but rather was a way for Corot to explore his new scenery outside of the studio. 

Houses near Orleans, about 1830, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. J. Paul Getty Museum.

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