"You’ve caught me looking very English today."
You’ve traveled far! Are you into antiquities?
"My wife is a classicist—she loves this collection. We’ve never been to the west coast before and actually just arrived yesterday. Only just arrived and I’m already famous!"
—James, September 29

"You’ve caught me looking very English today."

You’ve traveled far! Are you into antiquities?

"My wife is a classicist—she loves this collection. We’ve never been to the west coast before and actually just arrived yesterday. Only just arrived and I’m already famous!"

James, September 29

Mikiko Hara and her camera.

When shooting, she forms a secret relationship with the people she photographs—who usually aren’t aware of her presence. As she wanders the streets and subways of Tokyo, she waits for an urge or intuitive push to capture the scene. With the camera hanging from her neck, quiet shutter cocked, she guesstimates focal distance and then fires. A state of blankness is important to her process, as she seeks to capture the moment before her subject’s story can be reduced to words. In this, she strives to create tangible photographic pieces capturing a universal feeling.

Beyond Mikiko Hara’s Viewfinder

Four gorgeous tapestries now hang at the Getty Center.
Open this week, Spectacular Rubens: The Triumph of the Eucharist, features monumental weavings and preparatory paintings by Peter Paul Rubens both on loan and here in Los Angeles for a limited time.
Sneak peek at the title wall? Check it out.
#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

Four gorgeous tapestries now hang at the Getty Center.

Open this week, Spectacular Rubens: The Triumph of the Eucharist, features monumental weavings and preparatory paintings by Peter Paul Rubens both on loan and here in Los Angeles for a limited time.

Sneak peek at the title wall? Check it out.

#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

smithsonianlibraries:

Skeleton band war!
Illustration found in Die Totentänze (Stammler,1922)

Skeleton wins

smithsonianlibraries:

Skeleton band war!

Illustration found in Die Totentänze (Stammler,1922)

Skeleton wins

On October 16, 1793, the 38-year-old Marie-Antoinette met her end. An Austrian archduchess who became queen of France while still a teenager, she was subjected to a two-day mock trial and found guilty of conspiring with foreign powers against the French Republic.

It was widely believed that the queen had brought about the kingdom’s financial ruin in a time of economic crisis. Exhibit A: the Petit Trianon, a private country estate on the grounds of Versailles filled with glittering furniture and other decorative objets, which was cited as an example of her extravagance and debauchery.

“It is possible that the Petit Trianon cost immense sums,” she admitted to the Tribunal, “perhaps more than I would have wished. Little by little we were led into undertaking more expenses.”

More about these objects on The Getty Iris: Three Reasons to Love Marie-Antoinette

Queen Marie-Antoinette, about 1789, Pierre-Michel Alix after Elisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun. Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington

Side Chair, 1780–81, Jacques Gondoin, designer; frames by François-Toussaint Foliot; carved by Toussaint Foliot. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Wall Light, 1781, model by Claude-Jean Pitoin, designer; casting and chasing attributed to Louis-Gabriel Feloix, metalworker. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Chair, about 1787, frame by Georges Jacob; carved by Pierre-Claude Triquet and Jean-Baptiste-Simon Rode. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Eye-to-eye with a man with the costume of a burgher.
Expressive eyes and dramatic hatching reveal a capped man with a curly beard. Made as a single work of art (not a study for a painting or print), this striking drawing sheds a light on 1500s fashion.
Hats were worn to keep warm, even inside, as interiors were poorly heated at the time.
See the full picture here.

Eye-to-eye with a man with the costume of a burgher.

Expressive eyes and dramatic hatching reveal a capped man with a curly beard. Made as a single work of art (not a study for a painting or print), this striking drawing sheds a light on 1500s fashion.

Hats were worn to keep warm, even inside, as interiors were poorly heated at the time.

See the full picture here.

In 1854 the British Museum hired Roger Fenton to test the newfangled medium of photography to document its collection, rather than the usual modes of drawings and engravings. Fenton was at it for seven and a half years. 
This heavy-footed moa, a massive bird that became extinct following humans’ arrival in New Zealand, was once in the British Museum’s Hall of Fossils. Despite being both dead and flightless, the bird later moved across town to the collection of London’s Natural History Museum.
Dinornis elephantopus, about 1855, Roger Fenton. The J. Paul Getty Museum

In 1854 the British Museum hired Roger Fenton to test the newfangled medium of photography to document its collection, rather than the usual modes of drawings and engravings. Fenton was at it for seven and a half years. 

This heavy-footed moa, a massive bird that became extinct following humans’ arrival in New Zealand, was once in the British Museum’s Hall of Fossils. Despite being both dead and flightless, the bird later moved across town to the collection of London’s Natural History Museum.

Dinornis elephantopus, about 1855, Roger Fenton. The J. Paul Getty Museum

huntingtonlibrary:


Exhibits can also offer the singular pleasure of getting to know a living artist in a meaningful way. Such has been my recent good fortune with not just one legendary photographer, but two.

Today on VERSO, in a post co-published with thegetty, Huntington curator Jennifer Watts looks back at the relationships and connections forged over the five-year journey to create “Bruce Davidson/Paul Caponigro: Two American Photographers in Britain and Ireland,” opening at The Huntington on Nov. 8.
Read “Two American Photographers at Home” on VERSO and on the Getty Iris.
caption: Jennifer Watts with Paul Caponigro at his home in Maine, February 2014.

huntingtonlibrary:

Exhibits can also offer the singular pleasure of getting to know a living artist in a meaningful way. Such has been my recent good fortune with not just one legendary photographer, but two.

Today on VERSO, in a post co-published with thegetty, Huntington curator Jennifer Watts looks back at the relationships and connections forged over the five-year journey to create “Bruce Davidson/Paul Caponigro: Two American Photographers in Britain and Ireland,” opening at The Huntington on Nov. 8.

Read “Two American Photographers at Home” on VERSO and on the Getty Iris.

caption: Jennifer Watts with Paul Caponigro at his home in Maine, February 2014.

Tapestries and oil sketches by Peter Paul Rubens, made nearly 400 years ago to celebrate the glory of the Roman Catholic Church, have arrived. Each tapestry weighs 150 to 200 pounds and was hoisted into place with 100 yards of pulley rope.

More behind the scenes + video »

The Meeting of Abraham and Melchizedek, 1626–33, woven by Jan Raes I, Hans Vervoert, and Jacob Fobert after designs by Peter Paul Rubens. Wool and silk, 192 15/16 x 236 1/4 in. Patrimonio Nacional, Monasterio de las Descalzas Reales, Madrid. Tapestry Copyright © PATRIMONIO NACIONAL

Is it hard to walk and crochet?
"Not at all. I’m always crocheting. This one is a mystery. I walk a little, crochet, stop, look, sneak in a few more stitches, continue on. Who knows what it’ll turn out to be."
—Kimberly, September 29

Is it hard to walk and crochet?

"Not at all. I’m always crocheting. This one is a mystery. I walk a little, crochet, stop, look, sneak in a few more stitches, continue on. Who knows what it’ll turn out to be."

Kimberly, September 29

Chivalry first developed as a code of honor that emphasized bravery, loyalty, and generosity for knights at war in the 11th and 12th centuries.

#NowOnViewChivalry in the Middle Ages

Pages from A Tournament Book, 1560-70, Unknown. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XV 14

You could cut this tension with a knife!

Joseph struggles to escape the seducing grasp of the wife of the Potiphar, the Pharaoh’s guard. The very cape that shimmers and sparkles in this painting becomes evidence used against Joseph.

Joseph and Potiphar’s Wife, about 1630, Guide Reni. J. Paul Getty Museum. 

A mouth watering book perfect for a picnic. Food and Feasting in Art looks at sexy food symbols, decadent depictions of deliciousness, gorgeous still life works and more. Take a peek here. 
#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

A mouth watering book perfect for a picnic. Food and Feasting in Art looks at sexy food symbols, decadent depictions of deliciousness, gorgeous still life works and more. Take a peek here

#NowReading is a series with @gettypubs that celebrates books, reading everywhere, and art.

We’re so thrilled to have Japanese photographer Mikiko Hara in LA with us this week. 

Her work is featured in In Focus: Tokyo. She photographs young women she passes by on the streets of Tokyo. These snapshots give us a glimpse into a story we’ll never know the end to.

Do you have a question for Mikiko? About her photography, her practice, her thoughts on Tokyo, or beyond? We’ll get the scoop.

Ask us here, on Twitter or on Facebook.

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